Monmouth Beach Fire Department
 
 
 

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How to Keep Your Pipes From Freezing and What To Do If They Freeze

Tuesday, February 10, 2015  Most people are aware that when water freezes, it expands. That’s why your forgotten can of soda in the freezer exploded. When water freezes in a pipe, it will expand in the same way.

If it expands enough, it will burst, water will escape, and serious damage may occur. A 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can spew up to 250 gallons of water in a day. But this is one disaster you can prevent by taking a few simple precautions.

Both plastic and copper pipes are susceptible to freezing. Pipes freeze for a combination of three reasons: a quick drop in temperatures, poor insulation and a thermostat that is set too low.


Water pipes in warmer climates may be more vulnerable to winter cold spells, since the pipes are more likely to be located in unprotected areas outside of the building insulation. Homeowners can be proactive by determining whether they have any plumbing items that need protection, and then ensuring that they provide that protection.

Pipes in attics, crawl spaces and outside walls are all vulnerable to freezing, especially if there are cracks or openings that allow cold outside air to flow across the pipes.

Research at the University of Illinois has shown that wind chill, the same cooling effect of air and wind that causes the human body to lose heat, can play a major role in accelerating ice blockage, and thus, bursting water pipes.

When is it cold enough for pipes to freeze?

Homeowners should be alert to the danger of freezing pipes. Any time temperatures dip to 32 degrees, pipes may freeze, especially when wind chill is a factor.

Tips to avoid frozen pipes

• Know where the water cut-off valve is located in your home. Make sure that every responsible person in the home is aware of its location.
• Remove, drain and carefully store hoses used outdoors.
• Keep garage doors shut if any water lines are located inside.
• Seal all openings where cold air can get at unprotected water pipes. As stated above, it’s especially important to keep cold wind away from pipes.
• Pipes in attics and crawl spaces should be protected with insulation or heat. Pipe insulation is available in fiberglass or foam sleeves. Remember, the more insulation you use, the better protected your pipes will be.
• During freezing weather, leave cabinet doors open under kitchen or bathroom sinks (especially if they are located against an outside wall) to allow warmer room air to circulate around pipes. You can also place a small lamp with an incandescent bulb near the pipes. Be sure to remove anything flammable from the area to prevent fires.
• Let faucets drip slowly to keep water flowing through pipes that are vulnerable to freezing. If the dripping stops, it may mean that ice is blocking the pipe. Keep the faucet open to assist in pressure relief.
• Heating cables and tapes are effective for freeze protection. Follow manufacturer’s directions closely when using these products.
• Exterior pipes and hose bibbs (outdoor faucets) should be drained or enclosed in 2-inch insulation sleeves.
• When weather is very cold, keep thermostats at the same temperature day and night. Lowered temperatures at night may contribute to colder attic temperatures and thus, more vulnerable pipes.

What to do if your pipes freeze

If you turn on your faucets and nothing comes out, the water in your pipes is probably frozen. You may be able to thaw a frozen pipe with the warm air from a hair dryer. Make sure the faucet is open, and never stand in water while operating an electric appliance. Do not use a blowtorch or any open flame to thaw a pipe, to prevent fires.

If your water pipes have already burst, turn off the water at the main shut-off valve in the house. Leave the water faucets turned on. Again, make sure your family members know where the water shut-off valve is and how to operate it. 

   


 

2 Alarm Fire Rips Through Victorian Home in the Boro

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 12:49 am Early this morning, just before 1:00 am, the MBFC and Sea Bright Fire Rescue were dispatched to a reported structure fire at 13 River Ave in Monmouth Beach. First arriving crews found heavy fire through the roof of a 3 story wood frame single family, with reports of entrapment on the 3rd floor.First arriving crews along with Monmouth Beach PD, effected a search and an eventual rescue of a resident on the third floor.

A second alarm was struck by Monmouth Beach Chief, Ed Marsh, bringing in mutual aid & cover assignments from the City of Long Branch's  Uniformed Fire Division & Volunteers, Neptune Fire, Little Silver, Oceanport, West Long Branch, Deal & Asbury Park FD's. Fire crews worked fervently to contain the fire but were eventually ordered to evacuate the building, by Chief Marsh, due to deteriorating conditions. 


The fire was eventually brought under control and fire crews remained on scene well past 5:00 am performing overhaul and checking for hot spots.


Two responding Monmouth Beach Police Officers were evaluated and treated on scene for minor smoke inhalation. Neither required further medical attention


Also responding to the scene were EMS crews from; Monmouth Beach, West Long Branch, MAB response from Neptune as well as the Long Branch First Aid Squad.


The scene has since been turned over to the Monmouth Beach & Monmouth County Fire Marshal's Office for investigation.


MB Chiefs, 66,67,68 would like to thank the following agencies for their assistance and response.


- The Monmouth Beach Police Department
- Sea Bright Fire/Rescue
- The City of Long Branch Fire Dept
- Deal Fire Department 
- Little Silver Fire Dept
- Neptune Fire Dept.
- Oceanport Fire Dept
- West Long Branch Fire Dept
- Asbury Park Fire Dept
- Sea Bright Police Department 
- Monmouth Beach EMS
- Neptune MAB bus
- West Long Branch First Aid
- Long Branch First Aid
- The Ladies Auxiliary of Monmouth Beach 


     
Fire pushes through the roof at 13 River Ave

Fire pushes through the roof at 13 River
      Ave



 

Tips To Help Keep Your Pipes From Freezing

 With extremely cold temperatures expected, now is a good time to make sure your pipes are prepared to handle the cold weather.

We have three easy tips to help prevent your pipes from freezing:

1- Leave your faucets slightly turned on, so it trickles a little. This decreases pressure in the water line, decreasing the odds a pipe will burst.

2-Open your kitchen cabinet doors under the sink to allow more heated air to get to the water pipes.

3-Disconnect your hose outside. There could be water stored in the hose that could backup into the house as water freezes.

Also see these additional tips from our friends at American Water on how to prevent your pipes from freezing and or thaw them out if it is already too late.

   


 

2015 Line officers for Monmouth Beach Are Sworn In

On January 1, 2015,  The Line Officers for the Monmouth Beach Fire Company were sworn in by New Jersey's  Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno, as well as The Mayor and Commissioners of Monmouth Beach. 
The annual ceremony which began at 10:00 a.m.,was held inside the main bays of our firehouse. 





We are proud to announce our 2015 Line Officers; Have a Great Year & Good Luck Gentlemen




Chief of Department:      Edward A. Marsh

1st Assistant Chief:         Timothy P. Griffin

2nd Assistant Chief:        Robert "Pags" Pasquariello

Foreman:                           Carl Griffin

1st Assistant Foreman:    Jeff Mitchell

2nd Assistant Foreman:  Joseph  Feiter

(Not pictured Foreman, Carl Griffin)

     
Our 3 Chief Officers from l-r ( 1st Asst Chief Tim Griffin, Chief of Department Ed Marsh, 2nd Assistant Chief Bob Paquariello

Our 3 Chief Officers from l-r ( 1st Asst
      Chief Tim Griffin, Chief of Department
      Ed Marsh, 2nd Assistant Chief Bob
      Paquariello

2015 MBFC Line Officers; l-r( J. Feiter, J. Mitchell, T. Griffin, E.A. Marsh, R. Pasquariello)

2015 MBFC Line Officers; l-r( J. Feiter,
      J. Mitchell, T. Griffin, E.A. Marsh, R.
      Pasquariello)



 

Christmas Tree Safety Tips

 As you deck the halls this holiday season, be fire smart. A small fire that spreads to a Christmas tree can grow large very quickly.

FACTS:

  • One of every three home Christmas tree fires are caused by electrical failures
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes roughly one in every five of the fires.



  • SAFETY TIPS:

    • Make sure that you place your tree at least 3 feet away from any heat sources like fireplaces, candles, heaters, radiators, vents or lights.
    • Make sure the tree is not obstructing an exit.
    • Add water to the tree stand daily to prevent the tree from drying out.
    • Use lights that have a label  from a recognized testing laboratory, such as UL.
    • Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Read the manufacturers instructions for the # of light strands to connect.
    • Never use lit candles to decorate a tree.
    • ALWAYS turn off Christmas tree lights before going to bed or leaving home.
    AFTER CHRISTMAS:

    • Get rid of the tree after Christmas or when it is dry. Dried-out trees are a fire danger and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside against the home.
    • Check with your local community to find a recycling program.
    • Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer.


    The link below, shows you how quickly a Christmas Tree fire can grow out of control.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMtjGfr0tYs


       


     

    MBFC ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TREE SALES

      Sunday, November 30,  starts our Annual Christmas Tree Sale Fundraiser behind the Firehouse on Beach Road.Our lot will be packed full of; Douglas, Fraser & Balsam firs, ranging from 3' to 10'. Mixed wreaths, plain or decorated & Roping in various sizes.We have everything that you need to make your house look great this year for Christmas.

    Members will be available to help you find the perfect tree, wreath or length of roping during the following hours:

    Monday-Friday:   5 p.m.-8 p.m. 

    Weekends:  9 a.m.-7p.m.  

    **LOCAL DELIVERY AVAILABLE; ASK ONE OF OUR MEMBERS FOR DETAILS**

    Thank you for supporting your local firefighters and have a very Happy Holiday Season!!

       


     

    Turkey Fryer Safety from the MBFC

    Tuesday, November 25, 2014  The Monmouth Beach Fire Company would like to share the following Thanksgiving Cooking Safety Tips and an important message from Underwriters Laboratories (UL) about the dangers/hazards of using an outdoor gas fueled turkey fryer.

    The Monmouth Beach Fire Company wishes all of our family, members and friends a very Happy Thanksgiving  

    TURKEY FRYERS: Underwriters Laboratories (UL) discourages the use of outdoor gas-fueled turkey fryers that immerse the turkey in hot oil. These turkey fryers use a substantial quantity of cooking oil at high temperatures, and units currently available for home use pose a significant danger that hot oil will be released at some point during the cooking process. The use of turkey fryers by consumers can lead to devastating burns, other injuries and the destruction of property. 

    If you’ve never tried deep fried turkey ~ it’s great! But keep in mind there are many risks associated with doing it. Check out these safety tips and a brief 2-minute video from Underwriters Laboratories.


    Some Turkey Fryer hazards:

    • many units tip over easily, spilling the hot oil from the cooking pot.
    • If the cooking pot is overfilled with oil, the oil may spill out of the unit when the turkey is placed into the cooking pot. Oil may hit the burner or flames, causing a fire to engulf the entire unit.
    • Partially frozen turkeys placed into the fryer can cause a spillover effect. This too may result in an extensive fire.
    • With no thermostat controls, the units also have the potential to overheat the oil to the point of combustion.
    • The lid and the handles on the sides of the cooking pot get dangerously hot, posing severe burn hazards.
    Watch the fryer safety video below under the picture.



       


     

    Change your Clocks, Change Your Batteries

      -- The Monmouth Beach Fire Company, is reminding residents that when you turn back your clocks this Saturday night, Nov. 2, you should also change the batteries in all smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors.

    Approximately 83 percent of all fire deaths occur in the home. The majority of those occur at night when people were asleep in homes without working smoke alarms. This simple, life-saving habit of changing and testing the batteries in smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors along with testing your smoke alarms monthly to make sure they're working makes your home safer for you and your loved ones.


    A fire doubles in size every 30 seconds. The sound of the alarm will give you and your family those few extra seconds to get out and stay out of your home.
    Checking your smoke detector and carbon monoxide alarms & changing their batteries are one of the simplest things you can do to protect your family.

    Statistics indicate that more than 30% of home fires do not have a working smoke detector, or have no smoke detectors at all.
    When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because the batteries are missing.




         



     

    The Monmouth Beach Fire Company Reminds Residents: Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives!

     

    The Monmouth Beach Fire Company Reminds Residents:
    Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives!
     
    MONMOUTH BEACH, NJ, 10/07/2014 – Working smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a fire. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!”
    Along with firefighters and safety advocates nationwide, The Monmouth Beach Fire Company is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11, to remind local residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home and testing them monthly. 
    According to the latest NFPA research, working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half. Meanwhile, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
    In a fire, seconds count, Roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Home smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out.
    This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:
    • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement. 
    • Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all do.
    • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
    • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly.
    • Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.




     To learn more about smoke alarms and “Working Smoke Alarms Saves Lives”, visit NFPA’s Web site at www.firepreventionweek.org.




       


     

    MBFC announces End of September Mum Sale

    END OF SEPTEMBER MUM SALES!!

    Come out and get all of your fall mums and help support your local FD!

    Starting this Saturday, the 20th, The Monmouth Beach Fire Company will be selling nine, twelve, and fourteen inch Giant Mums as its end of September fundraiser.

    The Mum sales will be conducted on the apron in front of our firehouse on Beach Rd, this Saturday & Sunday ( the 20th & 21st) as well as next Saturday & Sunday (the 27th & 28th), Sale hours are 10:00 am - 6:00 pm.

    Stop on by and help support the men and women of the MBFC by purchasing one of our beautiful mums! All proceeds go directly to the MBFC.

     Stop by and say hello to Chris Marsh and the rest of the crew.                                                                

         



     
     
     

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